INNOVATIVE ARTS PROJECT PROMOTING EMOTIONAL WELLBEING IN HAMPSHIRE’S YOUNG PEOPLE CELEBRATES ITS SECOND YEAR WITH SHOWCASE EVENT

  • Hear Me, See Me, Speak Me (theatre): BearFace Theatre and Children in Care, Hampshire County Council
  • ICE Project
  • ICE Project
  • ICE Project
  • ICE Project
  • ICE Project
  • ICE Project
  • ICE Project
  • ICE Project
  • ICE Project
  • ICE Project
  • ICE Project

The ICE (Inspire/Create/Exchange) Project, which aims to address mental health issues in young people in Hampshire through the use of arts and culture, has celebrated its second year with a showcase evening of film, music and dance.

The project is a collaborative partnership between Hampshire Cultural Trust (HCT) and Hampshire CAMHS (Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service), which is run by Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust. The £210,000, three-year programme, works with young people who are supported by CAMHS, as well as groups who are identified as being at risk of developing mental health issues. In its first two years, the project has worked with nearly 250 vulnerable young people, a further 670 young people in schools and 200 health, youth and arts partners across Hampshire.

The celebration evening, which was held at The Point in Eastleigh, showcased a selection of just some of the projects in which the young people have participated over the past 12 months. These included scripting, acting in and producing a film about the effect of life with an eating disorder on young people; support me, a dance piece choreographed and performed live by young people from Intergr8 Movement, and a live performance of an original song by young people with autism. An exhibition of visual artwork and photography produced for the project was also on display at The Point.

‘The ICE Project continues to go from strength to strength in its second year,’ commented Paul Sapwell, HCT’s Chief Executive. ‘The benefit of arts and culture on our emotional and psychological health and wellbeing is evident in this tremendously powerful and moving celebration evening. We look forward to taking even greater steps together as the project enters its final year.’

Artswork, Hampshire CAMHS, the Barker-Mill Foundation and individual donors co-invested a total of £70k for the second year of the project.

Jane Bryant, Artswork Chief Executive, said, ‘The ICE Project clearly demonstrates the value of arts, culture and creativity in addressing the wellbeing and mental health issues of children and young people. For this programme to engage so many young people is testament to the need. We are really pleased to see all of the great work that has been produced by project participants so far and can’t wait to see what is produced in the future.’

Tim Jobling, trustee at the Barker-Mill Foundation, said: ‘Based on a set of principles to inspire, create and exchange, this project is a wonderful initiative for the young people of Hampshire that the Barker-Mill Foundation has been proud to support in line with the values of the Barker-Mill family.’

Helen Dove, Innovation & Participation Lead for Hampshire CAMHS, added: ‘The psychological benefits that art and culture can have on wellbeing is informing the formal part of the work we do with young people. As the project enters its final year, we continue to be incredibly proud of the creativity, honesty and boldness expressed by young people across all the groups.’

More about the project can be found at www.hampshireculture.org.uk/the-ice-project.